Our MW2010 Workshop: user involvement

April 17th 9.30AM
Museums and the Web (MW) is an annual conference exploring the various issues of culture, science and heritage on-line. MW features many formats such as plenary sessions, project demonstrations and workshops (named “Interactions”) each focussing on social, cultural, technological, economic, design and organisational issues. With representatives from institutions from 20+ countries worldwide, MW provides broad perspectives on issues and impacts of networked cultural, natural and scientific heritage.
The project Images for the Future will host a workshop on April 17th from 9:30 to 10:30 AM called “Many Heads Is Better Than One” (find the paper here (http://www.archimuse.com/mw2010/papers/oomen/oomen.html)). Our workshop will focus on the theme of user involvement. An important issue, since cultural heritage institutions have a public duty to make their collections available to a wide audience. But we also like to see our audiences as valuable sources of information, instead of mere ‘consumers’. Therefore, in many projects we try to engage these crowds as much as possible in our effort of gaining knowledge about our materials and stimulating various forms of reuse. In our short but interactive workshop, we will dig deeper into these themes and start a dialogue about whether our thoughts are up to speed with other people’s experiences and views on these matters.
We will organise our session around a model, used to map out emerging services from the heritage domain, pre-filled with MW2010 projects. These will be mapped out in two dimensions:
1. The organisational model behind the service (open vs. closed), and
2. What audience the service was targeted on (amateur vs. professional);
Being among people involved in these projects, we start our session with a discussion about the placement of the projects within the model. Were we right in mapping your projects as such? Once we agree on the positions, we could take the exercise a step further by positioning additional projects, coming from the participants of the session.
At this point we hope to bring the analysis of user involvement to the next level. Together with the participants we hope to gather and cluster lessons learned from the projects positioned within the model, starting with the two case examples from our paper, then moving on to experiences from the participants. In doing this, we hope to uncover common insights for particular clusters within the model. These insights could then – ideally – serve as guidelines for future projects positioned in the same cluster, making the exercise of trying to map future projects on our model a valuable effort [afbeelding].
We welcome all MW2010 participants to speak out and join in our short but hopefully relevant mini-workshop. Hope to see you on April 17th, 9:30AM [whereabouts unknown].
The results the workshop will be made available on this blog.

April 17th 9.30AM

Museums and the Web (MW) is an annual conference exploring the various issues of culture, science and heritage on-line. MW features many formats such as plenary sessions, project demonstrations and workshops (named “Interactions”) each focussing on social, cultural, technological, economic, design and organisational issues. With representatives from institutions from 20+ countries worldwide, MW provides broad perspectives on issues and impacts of networked cultural, natural and scientific heritage.

The project Images for the Future will host a workshop on April 17th from 9:30 to 10:30 AM called “Many Heads Is Better Than One” (find the paper here). Our workshop will focus on the theme of user involvement. An important issue, since cultural heritage institutions have a public duty to make their collections available to a wide audience. But we also like to see our audiences as valuable sources of information, instead of mere ‘consumers’. Therefore, in many projects we try to engage these crowds as much as possible in our effort of gaining knowledge about our materials and stimulating various forms of reuse. In our short but interactive workshop, we will dig deeper into these themes and start a dialogue about whether our thoughts are up to speed with other people’s experiences and views on these matters.

We will organise our session around a model (see image hereunder), used to map out emerging services from the heritage domain, pre-filled with MW2010 projects. These will be mapped out in two dimensions:

1. The organisational model behind the service (open vs. closed), and

2. What audience the service was targeted on (amateur vs. professional).

The model with a selection of MW2010 projects

The model with a selection of MW2010 projects

Being among people involved in these projects, we start our session with a discussion about the placement of the projects within the model. Were we right in mapping your projects as such? Once we agree on the positions, we could take the exercise a step further by positioning additional projects, coming from the participants of the session.

At this point we hope to bring the analysis of user involvement to the next level. Together with the participants we hope to gather and cluster lessons learned from the projects positioned within the model, starting with the two case examples from our paper, then moving on to experiences from the participants. In doing this, we hope to uncover common insights for particular clusters within the model. These insights could then – ideally – serve as guidelines for future projects positioned in the same cluster, making the exercise of trying to map future projects on our model a valuable effort.

We welcome all MW2010 participants to speak out and join in our short but hopefully relevant mini-workshop. Hope to see you on April 17th, 9:30AM at the Grand Hyatt hotel in Denver.

The results the workshop will be made available on this blog.

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